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"A timely bromide for the science blues...a very readable and useful resource for a wide range of audiences."
— Yale Forum on Climate Change and the Media

"Mooney and Kirshenbaum complement one another seamlessly in Unscientific America to deliver a hard hitting message informed by their years of experience in the public eye and behind a lab bench. The writing is superb, the narratives concise and easy to follow, and at 132 pages plus footnotes it is easily digested by readers of all ages and backgrounds. Order it, read it, and hope this book serves as a wake up call to Americans, and a catalyst to politicians, before it's too late."
— Daily Kos

"If it were up to me, this book would be required reading for all undergraduate science majors, along with Sagan's The Demon-Haunted World. Only when we begin training scientists to understand the relationship between science and society, and their crucial role in that relationship, will be begin to solve the dilemma so eloquently described in Unscientific America."
— Michael Mann, RealClimate.org

"A truly vital book for the future of our country, because we will fail to revive our nation if we continue to marginalize science and the scientific community."
— Buzzflash.com

" . . . highlights the Sagan-and Gould-shaped holes in our current scientific discourse"
— Seed Magazine

" . . . lays out in great and depressing detail just how the culture of science fails to match up with the ways that politics and the mass media work, and how it got to be this way. The problems really are huge, and if anything, they're getting worse, not better."
— Chad Orzel, "Uncertain Principles"

"I wish I had written this book . . . solid, concise writing that wastes no ink or paper (just 132 pages, not counting endnotes) getting to the heart of the problem."
— James Hrynyshyn, "The Island of Doubt"

"Mooney and Kirshenbaum make valid arguments that can only help to further the public debate about these important issues."
Publishers Weekly

 

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